Belize 2014

Belize 2014

I teach a class called Global Citizenship & Social Responsibility.  It’s about expanding your view of the world by working to make a difference in it.  Last year we took a garden from this…..

The Garden - Beginning

The Garden – Beginning

to this…..

Garden Beds

Students worked hard, in 100 degree heat and humidity to build relationships and a place to grow healthy foods.  Local students assisted.

We told the story on this website.  http://belizecmtrip2013.blogspot.com/

If you’d like to support student trips this year, or supplies for our trip, please click here.  Your kindness will be greatly appreciated.

You can specify if you would like donations to assist supporting student travel, or supplies for projects and projects are listed on the website.  This is not a charitable organization – but if you would like to donate and have your donation go to a charitable organization that supports our work please contact via links in the attached pages.  I’m not a professional fund-raiser, just listening to many students ask how to lower costs of the $2700.00 course fee that covers their travel and project costs.

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Like a Handshake, but with Noses and Butts

Busy, Hectic seasons mean little time to blog…. where did the inspiration go? Then today i found it. Doggy blogs!!! Yes that’s it.

Here’s another: http://www.pet360.com/dog/lifestyle/top-5-reasons-your-dog-is-your-best-dating-guide/mmDnIfeFWE-4THniXSepUA

Paws Abilities

In our society, a handshake is the standard greeting for meeting new people. We have a whole ritual that goes with it. First we verbally introduce ourselves, making eye contact and smiling, then we step towards the other person and grasp hands (usually right hands) for about two seconds with even pressure before disengaging and stepping back.

Dogs also have a standard greeting ritual, but as scent-oriented creatures their ritual varies slightly from ours. In a typical canine greeting the dogs will approach one another in an arc with loose bodies and a slight C-shaped curve to their spine. They will sniff each other’s noses, then sniff rear ends, and finally sniff noses again.

Greeting rituals are an important part of a functional society for both dogs and people. In both societies, our young need to be taught how to greet others appropriately. This is done through a combination of…

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Marriage Isn’t For You

Take the time to read this…. and read Seth’s follow-up blog and responses to this….

Seth Adam Smith

Having been married only a year and a half, I’ve recently come to the conclusion that marriage isn’t for me.

Now before you start making assumptions, keep reading.

I met my wife in high school when we were 15 years old. We were friends for ten years until…until we decided no longer wanted to be just friends. 🙂 I strongly recommend that best friends fall in love. Good times will be had by all.

Nevertheless, falling in love with my best friend did not prevent me from having certain fears and anxieties about getting married. The nearer Kim and I approached the decision to marry, the more I was filled with a paralyzing fear. Was I ready? Was I making the right choice? Was Kim the right person to marry? Would she make me happy?

Then, one fateful night, I shared these thoughts and concerns with my dad.

Perhaps each…

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Triple Chocolate Pumpkin Pie

Saw this recipe today and had to share…. must try.

Triple Chocolate Pumpkin Pie

From Martha Stewart, 2008

FOR THE FILLING

  • 2 cups finely ground graham cracker crumbs (about 16 crackers)
  • 3 ounces (6 tablespoons) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons packed light-brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 3 ounces bittersweet chocolate (preferably 61 percent cacao), finely chopped
  • 6 ounces semisweet chocolate (preferably 55 percent cacao), chopped
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 can (15 ounces) solid-pack pumpkin
  • 1 can (12 ounces) evaporated milk
  • 3/4 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons coarse salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • Ground cloves
  • 1 ounce milk chocolate, melted

DIRECTIONS

  1. STEP 1

    Make the crust: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine graham cracker crumbs, butter, sugars, salt, and cinnamon in bowl. Firmly press mixture into bottom and up sides of a deep, 9 1/2-inch pie dish. Bake until firm, 8 to 10 minutes.

  2. STEP 2

    Remove from oven, and sprinkle bittersweet chocolate over bottom of crust. Return to oven to melt chocolate, about 1 minute. Spread chocolate in a thin layer on bottom and up sides. Let cool on a wire rack. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees.

  3. STEP 3

    Make the filling: In a large heatproof bowl set over a pot of simmering water, melt semisweet chocolate and butter, stirring until smooth. Remove from heat.

  4. STEP 4

    Mix pumpkin, milk, brown sugar, eggs, cornstarch, vanilla, salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and a pinch of cloves in a medium bowl. Whisk 1/3 pumpkin mixture into chocolate mixture. Whisk in remaining pumpkin mixture until completely incorporated.

  5. STEP 5

    Transfer pie dish to a rimmed baking sheet, and pour pumpkin mixture into crust. Bake until center is set but still a bit wobbly, 55 to 60 minutes. Let cool in pie dish on a wire rack. Refrigerate until well chilled, at least 8 hours (preferably overnight). Before serving, drizzle melted milk chocolate on top. Serve immediately.

SOURCE

Martha Stewart Living, November 2008